Markforged raises $82 million for its industrial 3D printers

Markforged raises $82 million for its industrial 3D printers

6:53am, 20th March, 2019
3D printer manufacturer has raised another round of funding. Summit Partners is leading the $82 million Series D round with Matrix Partners, Microsoft’s Venture Arm, Next47 and Porsche SE also participating. When you think about 3D printers, chances are you’re thinking about microwave-sized, plastic-focused 3D printers for hobbyists. is basically at the other end of the spectrum, focused on expensive 3D printers for industrial use cases. In addition to increased precision, Markforged can manufacture parts in strong , such as carbon fiber, kevlar or stainless steel. And it can greatly impacts your manufacturing process. For instance, you can prototype your next products with a Markforged printer. Instead of getting sample parts from third-party companies, you can manufacture your parts in house. If you’re not going to sell hundreds of thousands of products, you could even consider using Markforged to produce parts for your commercial products. If you work in an industry that requires a ton of different parts but don’t need a lot of inventory, you could also consider using a 3D printer to manufacture parts whenever you need them. Markforged has a full-stack approach and controls everything from the 3D printer, software and materials. Once you’re done designing your CAD 3D model, you can send it to your fleet of printers. The company’s application also lets you manage different versions of the same part and collaborate with other people. According to the company’s , Markforged has attracted 4,000 customers, such as Canon, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, General Motors, Volkswagen and Adidas. The company has shipped 2,500 printers in 2018. With today’s funding round, the company plans to do more of the same — you can expect mass production printers and more materials in the future. Eventually, Markforged wants to make it cheaper to manufacture parts at scale instead of producing those parts through other means.
Industrial augmented reality smart headwear maker RealWear raises another $5M

Industrial augmented reality smart headwear maker RealWear raises another $5M

1:16pm, 19th February, 2019
(RealWear Photo) Vancouver, Wash.-based startup has raised another $5 million in a round led by Columbia Ventures Corporation to expand its global sales arm and invest in development of its industrial augmented reality headwear. Wearing his signature product, the HMT-1, Andy Lowery is co-founder and CEO of RealWear. (Andy Lowery Photo) Founded in 2016, RealWear sells a voice-controlled augmented reality device worn by industrial workers that provides remote video calling, document navigation, guided workflow, mobile forms and data visualization. It has two versions of the device priced at $2,000 and $5,000. The company has shipped more than 10,000 units to 800 customers globally in the past 18 months. It recently with China’s State Grid, the largest utility in the world. Other customers include Colgate-Palmolive, Volkswagen, Toyota, and others. “We essentially are the tip of the spear of a connected worker program for industry,” RealWear CEO Andy Lowery told GeekWire . “We are able to free a worker’s hands for the work by providing a wearable Android computer that is fully voice-controlled, even in extremely noisy environments. They can pull up documents, connect to other experts, and facilitate learning and problem solving in situ, meaning right there and then.” RealMax also invested in the new round, as did other strategic backers, advisors, employees, friends and family. Total funding to date in the 91-person company is $30 million. RealWear is ranked No. 98 on the , our index of Pacific Northwest startups. reported this week that funding in U.S.-based construction technology startups rose to nearly $3.1 billion last year, up from $731 million in 2017. Related: